Subject Verb Agreement With Prepositional Phrases Worksheet

3. Each sample was treated with the same dose of antibiotics. When other clauses occur between the subject and the verb, errors in the verb-subject chord become more frequent. Find out how to avoid them here. In each sentence, it is important to identify the real subject and make sure that the verb in the number matches that item rather than another name in the sentence. Here are some examples of sentences in which a clause between the two creates some confusion as to the correct form of verb. In any case, the actual object of the sentence is separated from the verb by a prepositional sentence. Composite subjects can also create tricky situations. Two nouns or pronouns bound by “and” create a plural subject and require a plural verb (z.B. “He and I travel to Europe” or “Mitochondria and nuclei shine green in this cell line”). However, the subject of a sentence is not affected if it is followed, with, as well as, or in addition. In such cases, it is the very nature of the subject that determines the form of the verb, not what follows the additional term. In English, the verb of a sentence must correspond to the subject, especially in terms of number.

In other words, singular subjects require singular verbs (for example. B cat migrations), and plural fans require plural forms (for example. B cats walk). In most cases, authors can easily choose the right verb form for a theme. However, when other clauses occur between the subject and the verb, errors in the verb-subject agreement become more frequent. Sometimes errors occur because the word processing software does not correctly identify the pattern and offers a false verb form, so be careful when writing important documents! The percentage of correct answers and the speed of responses increase considerably with practice. 2. The material applied to the blades of wind turbines ages rapidly in testing. 1.

Analysis of the results shows a significant difference between the groups. 4. Study participants receive questionnaires.

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I am Kimberly Reynolds and the author of Fundraising Success, first published in 2002. I've been writing about fundraising ideas for schools. churches and youth sports groups since 1999. You can find the latest version of Fundraising Success on Amazon.com. I also have some free reports about getting publicity for your next fundraiser event and how to recruit more volunteers available for you to download at http://www.scribd.com/fundraiserhelp